Sunday, May 28, 2006

Sunday Porsche Blogging: Porsche Type Numbers – Part 2

As the name states this is the second in a series of posts detailing the project numbers that Porsche has used. These project numbers are mostly chronological. As mentioned in Part 1 these project numbers are not to be confused with the somewhat confusing part numbers system.

Type 115
1939
Supercharged Kdf 1.1 liter engine overhead camshafts

Type 116
1938/39
Kdf backed 1.5 liter racing car with Type 114 components

Type 128
1940/41
Kdf based amphibian Schwimmwagen

Type 135
1940/41
130 Watt Wind power Generator

Type 136
1940/41
736 Watt Wind Generator

Type 137
1940/41
4500 Watt Wind Power Generator

Type 138
1940/41
Amphibian Schwimmwagen, alternative design

Type 160
1941
Design for Integral Body/Fraame for Kdf-Wagen

Type 166
1942/45
Kdf-Powered 4x4 Schwimmwagen, final design

Type 170
1942
Marine Sturmboot Engine, version 1

Type 171
1942
Marine Sturmboot Engine, version 2

Type 174
1942
Sturmboot Engine using Normal Kdf Engine

Type 175
1942
Steel Wheeled Military Tractor, the Ostradschlepper

Type 180
1942
Tank Design with Electric Transmission

Type 181
1942
Tank Design with Hydraulic Transmission

Type 205
1942
180 ton Tank, Maus

Type 212
1942
Air-Cooled 16-Cylinder Diesel Tank Engine

Type 245
1942
18-Ton Multi-Purpose Tank

Type 250
1942/43
Turretless Tank with 105 mm Gun

Type 285
1945
3.5 hp experimental Water Turbine

Type 293
1944
Personnel Carrier

Type 300
1944
Jet Engine to Power V-1 flying bomb "vengance weapon"

Type 309
1945
2-Stroke Diesel Engine for VW or Tractor

Type 312
1945
Gasoline Tractor

Type 313
1945
Diesel Tractor

Type 323
1946
11 hp Diesel Tractor

Type 328
1946
28-hp Tractor

Type 352
1946
Passenger car design for von Senger A.G., Switzerland

Type 356
1947
First Porsche Automobile, Open, Mid-Engined two-seater built with the VW as the basis
The link is to a Wikipedia photo of the actual first Porsche car


Source: Porsche Excellence Was Expected - The Complete Story of the Sports and Racing Cars
Karl Ludvigsen
1st Edition, 1977 pg. 517
2nd Edition, 2003 pg. 1484

The Ludvigsen work is an ongoing labor of love and a must read for any serious student of Porsche history.

This post and a collection of Sunday Porsche Blogging posts are available at the aptly named Sunday Porsche Blogging.

1 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Your are Nice. And so is your site! Maybe you need some more pictures. Will return in the near future.
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11:58 AM  

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